Tag Archive: quantitative easing

Patrick Artus writes for FTSE Global Markets on the ECB’s efforts to reactivate the sluggish eurozone economy

Since 2014, the eurozone has received two opportunities for economic growth: the quantitative easing (QE) programme and plummeting oil prices. But, has the European Central Bank (ECB) capitalised upon these gifts to advance the eurozone economy? Patrick Artus, Natixis’ chief economist, believes the ECB’s success has been partial. Writing for FTSE Markets, Artus explains that …

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Natixis’ Patrick Artus writes for Institutional Investor on the potential causes of a future global economic downturn

Some market observers predict a global financial crisis in 2016-2017; one just as serious, if not more so, than that of 2008-2009. Writing for Institutional Investor’s Unconventional Wisdom column, Patrick Artus, Natixis’ Chief Economist, analyses the global economy today and discusses the potential triggers of the next crisis. Signs of financial fragility have been growing since …

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Natixis’ Patrick Artus examines ECB’s ability to restore eurozone growth in FTSE Global Markets

Writing in FTSE Global Market, Patrick Artus, Natixis’ Chief Economist, shares his thoughts on whether the European Central Bank’s (ECB) recent economic stimuli is enough to regenerate the eurozone economy. Despite conditions being favourable for an upturn, the eurozone has remained sluggish. In response, the ECB has implemented an aggressive economic package – yet has neglected …

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In El Pais, Natixis’ Artus talks economic recovery, growing inequality and the next financial crisis

El Pais meets Patrick Artus, Natixis’ Chief Economist, to discuss the global economy. Touching on Europe, Artus says that “despite the recent Greek crisis, I’m optimistic on Europe’s recovery”, which he believes many experts have underestimated. Artus argues that there are positive signs in consumption, exports, investment and even in the housing market, which will translate …

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Natixis’ Artus writes for Bloomberg Brief on why the ECB will see QE to the end

In the latest Bloomberg Brief, Patrick Artus argues that despite speculation, the ECB is keen to continue its programme – as made clear by its President Mario Draghi on Wednesday, who said after Wednesday’s monetary policy meeting that “we plan to keep our course steady and unchanged.” For the ECB, the inflationary target was merely …

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Is QE the death of DB? S&P tells Pensions Today that reigning in pension plan deficits will be a huge challenge for companies over the coming years

It is the view of Paul Watters, Senior Director at Standard & Poor’s Ratings Services, that recent economic developments are causing the funding conditions for corporate defined-benefit (DB) pension plans to deteriorate. He explores this view in this month’s edition of Pensions Today, in which he points out that such pension schemes in Europe are …

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S&P says QE has few benefits for pension schemes

As economic developments in Europe are causing funding conditions of corporate defined benefit (DB) pension plans to deteriorate, senior director and head of corporate research for Standard & Poor’s, Paul Watters, writes for FTSE Global Markets about the less-than-expected impact of the European Central Bank’s (ECB) Quantitate Easing (QE) program. Furthermore, he goes on to …

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Natixis’ Artus proclaims expansionary monetary policy as the bête noire of Europe’s economy

In a recent IFR article, Natixis’ Chief Economist Patrick Artus argues that despite QE being hailed as a panacea for economic health, it is only for the benefit of the financial markets. Indeed, it is because of bond holders – such as institutional investors and banks – that monetary policies will remain expansionary for a …

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Patrick Artus argues why the ECB must plan its exit from QE now

In Artus’ latest Institutional Investor blog, he assesses what will happen to the economy when oil prices rise again and the temporary boost to the economy, stemmed from oil prices and the ECB’s own measures, begins to diminish. What’s more, the ECB need to assess what will happen when excess liquidity and a distortion of …

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